The importance of backup disaster recovery for business continuity

How long can your business afford to last after experiencing a data breach or when your technology is not functioning? Each year, the costs of downtime affect business continuity for thousands of organizations as a result of improperly secured data. For your business, this value is measured by the total loss of revenue during downtime, regulatory fees and fines, and the costs of recovery needed to ensure business continuity.

Backup Disaster Recovery (BDR) is a critical part of Business Continuity Planning (BCP). By preparing for the worst and implementing a proper recovery plan, your organization should be able to weather all technical threats to business continuity and minimize the costs of downtime.

Business continuity solutions

Developing a robust business continuity plan requires both detailed consideration for technical requirements and a broad strategic vision for the backup disaster recovery process. These components include redundant infrastructure and connectivity, backup and disaster recovery systems, and services and processes to rapidly recover key systems and keep downtime expenses under control.

For example, organizations should set minimum tolerances for system failure. These will trigger a response and require immediate action that drives your disaster recovery program. Automated software can help notify your business and IT support team of the right time to respond.

What are the costs of system downtime?

All technology platforms are subject to technical glitches, user error and even attack or intrusion by malicious third parties. Each one of these scenarios may result in the downtime of critical operational systems used by employees, customer-facing web portals and e-commerce stores, or even basic utilities such as telephone or internet network systems.

Downtime tends to cost organizations most when it hits mission-critical systems or other systems that employees need to do their daily work. Lack of basic utilities like internet access, phone lines and email will obviously take a toll on the business when they’re down. Even when these utilities are up, businesses feel a financial impact when line-of-business applications, cloud applications or any other systems needed to book revenue or perform services aren’t functioning.

Lost sales and revenue, customer churn, decreased customer satisfaction and brand reputation are some of these costs. Additionally, regulatory organizations can issue fines and fees to businesses that don’t fulfill compliance requirements or fail to implement proper backup disaster and recovery measures. These costs of business continuity are particularly challenging since operating costs are fixed and therefore still incurred even when systems are down.

What is Backup Disaster Recovery?

The purpose of backup data recovery is to allow organizations to operate their business without interruption and be protected against data loss or equipment failure. Many businesses install an on-site computer known as the Backup Disaster Recovery, or BDR. This computer is configured directly to the data network in the form of either a desktop or a rack installation. Every single computer or device that may require disaster recovery is then backed up by the BDR, whose data storage capabilities are designed to fit the business. They may range from 250 GB to 1 TB or even larger and support systems running on Windows 2003, R2/2008/2008, R2/2012/2012, R2/2016 and Windows 7/8/8.1/10.

Periodically, software will run to create and commit data backups on the BDR and potentially at a third-party data center. Computers or devices that require data recovery will then revert to the most recent backup in the event of a data loss event.

BDR is a necessary step to preserve business continuity within your organization. The team at SecureTech can design processes to help your business proactively monitor and respond to events that require immediate backup. Contact SecureTech’s experts today to learn more about business continuity or backup recovery.